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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Mad Dog" Episode 12

2017/11/17 | Permalink

Noo-ri's grave injury sparks another round of regret and guilt for the "Mad Dog" team's top dog and puppy, as they go into another fit of man-angst over the lives they may endanger due to their plans. There is no time to waste on self-pity, however, as their enemies close in and a new one is born to spice things up. Noo-ri's daddy dearest is more involved than we previously suspected, you see.

Despite having been introduced to On Joo-sik (Jo Young-jin) early on in the series, he has not felt relevant for a while. Seeing him revealed as the father to a mad dog member and then as one of the key culprits feels all too sudden. While useful as a rogue element, it looks like his choice has been made and this sadly means that we have another half-baked villain on our hands.

Min-joon having a breakdown over Noo-ri's injuryHyeon-gi taunting Joo-sik

I think the reason why Hyeon-gi (Choi Won-young) is the most enjoyable is because he at least has consistency. He is a terrible person who trusts no one but himself and tries to manipulate everyone. Hong-joo (Hong Soo-hyun) on the other hand is all over the place at the moment. She chooses between her father and crush, between her moral objections and the company every few segments. Most importantly, her reasoning or feelings are never developed in order for her actions to not feel erratic.

Speaking of radical changes, it is thankful that Min-joon's (Woo Do-hwan) are not as sudden. It took him a while to stop being a smug entitled brat, but his backstory explains his disdain for and inability to trust and interact with anyone but himself. I find his turn believable, because it makes sense that it would only happen after the young man had seen enough proof of one's caring. The "Mad Dog" team have been faithfully kind to him and morally upstanding on things that matter.

Joo-sik and Hong-joo discovering Noo-ri spyingThe dog team without Noo-ri

As much as I dislike Hong-joo's fluctuating personality and plot use, I hope that she can follow through with her plan this time. We currently have four villains who never deal any sort of considerable blow to the heroes and the stakes feel so very low at the moment. The mad dog team has enough dirt in its past and seeing no one try to use that until now feels very unrealistic.

I can handle a little lack of plot logic, but in a series that already has very superficial character connections, a simplistic and mostly uneventful plot and villains who look like they need assistance to decide between wine and whiskey, it stands out. "Mad Dog" still has a chance at a thrilling finale. It will not make the work a better drama, but they might as well leave with a bang.

"Mad Dog" is directed by Hwang Ee-kyeong, written by Kim Soo-jin-V and features Yoo Ji-tae, Woo Do-hwan, Ryu Hwa-young, Kim Hye-sung and Jo Jae-yun.

Written by: Orion from 'Orion's Ramblings'

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