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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Man to Man" Episode 5

2017/05/25 | 713 views | Permalink

"Man to Man" may have a dark side, but it's really just a story about three people who are growing up. In between all of that are corrupt officials doing dirty deeds to acquire lofty positions, burgeoning love triangles, and bouts of situational humor. It is the last that surprises me most, especially with the dark subject matter that surrounds Seol-woo's life as a ghost agent.

The events that tied the episode together were the romantic happenings between Seol-woo and Do-ha. Placed once again with Woon-gwang and his gang for a top secret mission, Seol-woo uses romance as his guise. What he doesn't realize -- at least not fully -- is that romance is going to get the better of him. He thoroughly enjoys winning over Do-ha who is absolutely smitten with him. Her displays of adorable confusion over his feelings for her and over which decision she should make regarding him are worthy television moments. It is the tension of the push and pull that makes for entertaining romance and we get plenty of it here.

Man to Man 3Man to Man 4

Perhaps more lovable than the main couple is the Seol-woo/Woon-gwang pairing. Woon-gwang is such a likable character with his combination of ego, charm, and vulnerableness. The last of those is shown most when Mi-eun is around, especially because she selfishly inserts herself in his life. Their story is quite tragic and, I'm sure, will prove moreso as Seung-jae becomes more and more jealous of Mi-eun's feelings for her ex.

Some of my favorite moments of the show are when humor emerges. Often this is in the form of Seol-woo's facial expressions that are accompanied by cutesy sound effects. Although this doesn't sound quite as fun in writing, it is very entertaining in action. also, the juxtaposition of Seol-woo's missions with the romantic phone calls he makes with Do-ha are a great way to get two things done at once while making us laugh.

Man to Man 1Man to Man 2

As for the resident evils, Congressman Baek is again outsmarted by Seung-jae who lords overhim. Although allies, they are not friends. I anticipate a time when they will do battle. Another ghost agent searches for the wooden statues for these two ambitious men and will fight Seol-woo again - they are, after all, after the same thing. The newest villain is not really a villain, but a misguided character: Do-ha's father. He is the source of the second wooden statue that Seol-woo's employers and Congressman Baek are searching for. This bodes badly for his relationship with Do-ha, but that is what creates some delicious romantic drama.

If "Man to Man" continues to be this zippy, I do think I'll enjoy it very much.

Written by: Lisa Espinosa AKA Raine from 'Raine's Dichotomy'

"Man to Man" is directed by Kim Sang-ho-I and Lee Chang-min-I, written by Kim Won-seok-II, and features Park Hae-jin, Kim Min-jung, Park Sung-woon, and Yeon Jung-hoon.

Watch Episode 5 on Netflix!

Note : due to licensing, videos may not be available in your country

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