Pinterest
NewsLetter DailyWeekly
 
My HanCinema | Sign up, Why ? Your E-mail   Password    Auto| Help
HanCinema :: The Korean Movie and Drama Database, discover the South Korean cinema and drama diversity Contact HanCinema HanCinema on TwitterFaceBook HanCinema PageHanCinema on Twitter

Kara's album receives most downloads on iTunes Japan

2010/10/01 | 821 views | Permalink | Source

Korean girl group Kara [DSP Media]

Korean female idols Kara have grabbed another title in Japan with their best album becoming the most downloaded record on iTunes Japan.

On Friday, the girls' agency DSP Media announced that "Kara BEST 2007-2010" was the No. 1 downloaded album on iTunes Store Pop.

It was the second best-selling album on the prestigious Oricon daily albums chart on September 29.

The special album features their hit songs such as "Pretty Girl", "Honey", "Lupin" and "Mister", the last song also being the group's Japanese debut single, starting from when they debuted in 2007.

Kara has led a successful music career in Japan since May this year, becoming the first Asian female group to place in the top 10 on the weekly singles chart with their album "Mister" and their DVD "Kara VACATION" reaching the highest rank for an Asian DVD.

They are currently preparing for their appearance on Asashi TV's popular live music show "Music Station" on October 15.

The quintet will release their second Japanese single next month.

Reporter : Lucia Hong luciahong@
Editor : Jessica Kim jesskim@
<ⓒ10Asia All rights reserved>

Attention You're reading the news with potential spoilers, make them spoiler free, dismiss


 

 

More videos

 Previous news

Subscribe to HanCinema Pure to remove ads from the website (not for episode and movie videos) for US$0.99 monthly or US$7.99 yearly (you can cancel anytime). The first step is to be a member, please click here : Sign up, then a subscribe button will show up.

Settings

Remove ads

Sign up

Sharing

Activate

Spoilers

Visible, hide

Drama of the week

Learn to read Korean in 90 minutes or less using visual associations